31 July 2009

You, the Living, Finally in the US

You, the Living [Du levande] - dir. Roy Andersson - 2007 - Sweden/Germany/France/Denmark/Norway/Japan - Palisades Tartan

Over two years after its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, Roy Andersson's astounding You, the Living, a sequel of sorts to Songs from the Second Floor from 2000, finally makes its official US premiere in New York this week after being left in limbo after Tartan Films USA closed its doors. For those familiar with Songs from the Second Floor, You, the Living is a continuation of Andersson's vibrant style and bizarre humor, chronicling moments in the lives of a selective group of a Sweden city.

While Songs from the Second Floor was shrouded in a grim, apocalyptic tone, most of those who've seen You, the Living have agreed that what separates the two is the latter's beaming serenity. One sequence in particular, involving a young newlywed couple in a moving house, is one of the most spectacularly incandescent scenes I've seen in a really long time. You, the Living is just one of the amazing films from some of the most dazzling filmmakers from around the world that will make its US premiere, after dangling in distribution oblivion, this year. Keep your eye out for György Pálfi's Taxidermia in August from here! Films and Ulrich Seidl's Import/Export, also from Palisades Tartan.

3 comments:

Chuck Williamson said...

It's about damn time.

Fortunately, this will be playing theatrically here in Columbus at the Wexner. While I've already seen it, I am very excited about watching it again on the big screen. For those who have not seen SONGS FROM THE SECOND FLOOR in a theater--well, you're missing out, quite frankly, as the Andersson's deep-focus photography really pops out.

Joe said...

I haven't seen either in a theatre, so here's hoping I get the chance with this one.

pnc said...

Agree. I already own both films. I've seen SONGS in the theatre three times in the two weeks it was out many years ago. I'm excited about the upcoming MOMA retrospective of Roy Andersson's work and the opportunity to see it on a wide screen so I can get at the depth of field.